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Federal Bureau of Prisons Population Report: December 26, 2013

By Christopher Zoukis

Below is the latest prison population report from the Bureau of Prisons.  The report details each prison, including private prisons, operated under the umbrella of the BOP.  The report provides the name of the facility, location, and current population.  Total population numbers for the various types of facilities are stipulated at the end of the report.

 

Population of all BOP Institutions

 

Facility                State        Population

ALDERSON FPC WV         1145

ALICEVILLE FCI   AL           934

ALICEVILLE-CAMP            AL           254

ALLENWOOD LOW FCI   PA          1316

ALLENWOOD MED FCI   PA          1312

ALLENWOOD USP            PA          1052

ASHLAND FCI     KY           1227

ASHLAND-CAMP              KY           304

ATLANTA USP    GA          1951

ATLANTA-CAMP               GA          557

ATWATER USP   CA          1480

ATWATER-CAMP              CA          147

BASTROP FCI      TX           1156

BASTROP-CAMP               TX           198

BEAUMONT LOW FCI     TX           2005

BEAUMONT MED FCI     TX           1734

BEAUMONT USP-CAMP                TX           571

BEAUMONT USP              TX           1484

BECKLEY FCI        WV         1642

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Federal Bureau of Prisons Population Report: December 19, 2013

By Christopher Zoukis

Below is the latest prison population report from the Bureau of Prisons.  The report details each prison, including private prisons, operated under the umbrella of the BOP.  The report provides the name of the facility, location, and current population.  Total population numbers for the various types of facilities are stipulated at the end of the report.

 

Population of all BOP Institutions

Facility               State        Population

ALDERSON FPC WV         1155

ALICEVILLE FCI   AL           936

ALICEVILLE-CAMP            AL           254

ALLENWOOD LOW FCI   PA          1312

ALLENWOOD MED FCI   PA          1301

ALLENWOOD USP            PA          1062

ASHLAND FCI     KY           1234

ASHLAND-CAMP              KY           303

ATLANTA USP    GA          1910

ATLANTA-CAMP               GA          552

ATWATER USP   CA          1439

ATWATER-CAMP              CA          140

BASTROP FCI      TX           1163

BASTROP-CAMP               TX           205

BEAUMONT LOW FCI     TX           1974

BEAUMONT MED FCI     TX           1717

BEAUMONT USP-CAMP                TX           579

BEAUMONT USP              TX           1475

BECKLEY FCI        WV         1645

BECKLEY-CAMP WV         446

BENNETTSVILLE FCI         SC           1661

BENNETTSVILLE-CAMP  SC           145

BERLIN FCI          NH          509

BERLIN-CAMP   NH          97

BIG SANDY USP KY           1442

BIG SANDY-CAMP           KY           123

BIG SPRING FCI TX           1567

BIG SPRING-CAMP          TX           220

BROOKLYN MDC               NY          2332

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Assembly Committee Hears Ideas on Reducing Prison and Jail Populations

By KTVU.com

SAN FRANCISCO — A state Assembly committee gathered ideas from Bay Area law enforcement and community representatives at a hearing in San Francisco Wednesday on how to help people avoid going to prison and avoid going back.

The purpose of the Select Committee on Justice Reinvestment session was to obtain information that could shape legislation aimed at reducing prison and jail overcrowding and increasing rehabilitation, according to committee co-chair Tom Ammiano, D-San Francisco.

“I think we have a long way to go. When you have a (statewide) recidivism rate of 70 to 30, we know there’s a lot more to do,” Ammiano said after the hearing at the State Building.

The San Francisco hearing was one of a series the committee is holding around California on various prison issues.

Programs described by local experts included diversion projects, alternative community courts, gang ceasefire efforts and services for released prisoners making the transition back to their communities.

Richmond police Chief Chris Magnus and San Francisco District Attorney George Gascon told the committee that such programs make sense not only morally but economically as well.

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Slowly Closing the Gates: A State-by-State Assessment of Recent Prison Closures

By Christopher Petrella and Alex Friedmann

After nearly 40 years of unprecedented growth, our nation’s expanding prison population has finally begun to sputter. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2010 marked the first year since 1972 in which, taken together, state and federal correctional populations declined slightly – a trend that continued in 2011.

This modest reduction reflects revisions to draconian drug laws (particularly in New York and Florida), curtailing re-incarceration for technical parole violators, and the burgeoning implementation of “good time” early-release credits. As a result, 15 states have closed 35 adult correctional facilities over the last two years, according to the National Conference of State Legislators, while additional closures are pending in 2013.

Although prison closures are widely celebrated by prisoners and criminal justice reform activists alike, the implementation of such plans is rarely straightforward and often encounters opposition from local communities, prison guard unions and lawmakers in the districts where facilities are slated to close. If achieved, prison closures are usually piecemeal and result in the transfer of prisoners to other facilities, not additional releases. Similarly, prison employees displaced by closures are often absorbed by other facilities, not fired. The predictable tumult resulting from actual and proposed prison closures reflects the competing and contradictory interests held by various stakeholders involved in the process.

Despite signaling a hopeful interruption in the business-as-usual crime and punishment mania that has characterized U.S. penal policy for the past half-century, it’s possible to argue that the increasing number of prison closures represents just as much an experiment in budget-cutting in the short term as it does in durable criminal justice reform over the long term.

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